Modern Speech Paterns



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Modern Speech Paterns

Postby Moshe » Mon Aug 24, 2015 3:49 pm

I have little robin in my cap about some modern expressions in language.
The phrase I have a problem with at this moment is one that occurs now even in country songs- Reba, who is old enough to know better, has used it. Kacey Musgraves, who I would have thought too classy & original to use such a phrase also has.

The phrase in question is the one that equates being inundated with phone calls from friends to nuclear war.

I think even Lady Antebellum used this phrase on their drinking song.

The phrase is "blowing up my phone". It refers to friends calling your mobile all the time.

OK, it might be irritating to have too many calls, but equating it to nuclear annihilation? Something has gone wrong.

On a similar note, I was listening to Lee Ann Womack on a radio concert! Lee Ann objects to the phrase"Country rocks!". Says ms Womack, "No it doesn't, & it shouldn't! It is Country, Not Rock!"
Cor Blimey, Guv'nor! 8)
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Re: Modern Speech Paterns

Postby kev » Mon Aug 24, 2015 8:34 pm

Does "blowing up a phone" necessarily equate to a nuclear explosion? Surely a small firework would do the job just as effectively?
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Re: Modern Speech Paterns

Postby Moshe » Tue Aug 25, 2015 5:41 pm

kev wrote:Does "blowing up a phone" necessarily equate to a nuclear explosion? Surely a small firework would do the job just as effectively?

ossibly, Kev. Or even an old style parcel bomb.

But the phrase does sound unnecessarily apocalyptic when all that is meant is someone has been politely calling you.

You have a call on hold, Madame, would do fine.
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Re: Modern Speech Paterns

Postby Smudger » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:43 am

Moshe wrote:I have little robin in my cap

Now that's a new expression to me!
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Re: Modern Speech Paterns

Postby Moshe » Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:06 pm

Smudger wrote:
Moshe wrote:I have little robin in my cap

Now that's a new expression to me!

It's a variation of an older one.
A bit like "An apple in the hand is worth 2 in the tree"
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Re: Modern Speech Paterns

Postby lo&m » Wed Aug 26, 2015 9:38 pm

My bugbear is way people mis-use the word, bunch. A bunch is a number of things growing, fastened or grouped together. Some things just cannot reasonably be bunched together. I'm looking at you Brad Paisley. You cannot "lose a bunch of weight." Weight cannot be grouped together. Weight is a collective term for ounces and pounds (not stones in american usage). Very few people would say, "I lost a bunch of pounds and ounces" they would state how many pounds they lost, as in, "I lost five pounds this week" or "I've shed thirty pounds since starting this diet." I suppose at a stretch, a bunch of pounds is allowable but a bunch of weight, never.
Of course Paisley isn't the only offender, just one of the more glaring examples of this particular awful speech pattern. Another one that grates on me is Imma. As in Kanye West's stage-hogging "Imma let you finish ..." If it was black vernacular it would be ok but whites use it too.
I'm usually pretty laid-back about american idioms, I don't expect them to speak english the way the english do but this is just wrong.
Country is a state of mind, not a state of America.
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